Where does author Katharine Johnson get her ideas from?

Today I am delighted to welcome Katharine Johnson to my blog.  Katharine is a very talented writer and I recently read and enjoyed her novel, The Silence.  Although I have asked Katharine on my blog to talk about her latest novel, The Suspects.

Hi, Katharine.  And welcome to my blog.  Let’s kick off with that question all writers are said to dread (and which appeared in my Ideas Store column in Issue 214 (August 2019) of Writers’ Forum magazine.  

Where did you get the idea for your psychological thriller, The Suspects from? 

Katharine:

cover imageThe idea was probably born many years ago during my own house shares as a student and graduate in the 1980s and 1990s – although my experiences were much less exciting and terrible than those of my characters.

But I suppose one of the reasons I chose a house share situation was because I’ve been thinking about them again recently as one of my daughters is about to graduate and the other one’s about to start university in Bristol so they’ll be looking at shared accommodation. (Although with hindsight it might not have been the best time for me to be thinking too much about this!)

I wanted to capture that optimism and anticipation you feel when you move in with a group of people, but also play on that frisson of doubt about how well you’ll get on together and how well you really know each other. It’s one thing to worry about the people next door but when you’re under the same roof there’s no escape.

I liked the idea of a house share because it provides a claustrophobic environment in which the characters find themselves dependent on each other for their survival but are increasingly fearful of the enemy within. 

As the saying goes, you don’t truly know someone until you live with them.

My five characters have very different tastes, habits and political beliefs. Throw into the mix a shared mortgage, falling house prices and rocketing repayments at the height of Thatcher’s Britain and you have a potentially explosive situation. 

But things get so much worse when they discover a body after one of their parties – and it’s clear they’ll be the first suspects. Because they each have reasons from their past not to trust the police they make a decision which will force them into a series of secrets and lies – but can they trust each other?

There are light-hearted moments as the tensions build between the characters and I had fun researching this bit – I’m grateful to everyone who shared their housemate-from-hell story with me! But there is also a gathering angst and paranoia as they question each other’s ability to keep a secret, and discover some shocking truths.

As with my other novels (The Silence, The Secret and Lies, Mistakes and Misunderstandings), my main characters aren’t bad people but they make a bad choice. I like to put ordinary people in extraordinary situations and see how they cope. 

I chose to tell the story in the confessional first person narrative from a single viewpoint as I hoped it would make it feel more immediate. My worry was that I’d never be able to convince the reader but I’ve been thrilled with reviews such as “It’s actually worryingly easy to forgive them their mistakes”,  “I could completely understand how they talked themselves into doing something so reprehensible”, “I felt like I was not only reading the story but living it as well” and “My heart was racing at times as I shared their guilt.”

Would you have made the same decisions my characters did? Hopefully not, but if you read the book I hope you can understand why they made the decision they did, and most of all I hope you enjoy reading it.

Me.

That’s fascinating, Katharine.  Thank you so much.  So now, let’s move  on to your writing in general.  What inspires you most? Is it characters? Settings? Or maybe even books you’ve read?

Katharine

All of those. I think initially I get excited about a situation. Then I think about the characters as they will determine how the story unfolds.  

Me.

And how did your writing journey start? Have you always written? 

Katharine.

I’ve always enjoyed making up stories and wrote my first book aged nine on my plastic typewriter. It was a collection of stories about a naughty chimp (still unpublished!). My grandmother encouraged me to write when she was babysitting – probably as a way to keep me quiet.

Me.

What was your first published piece?

Katharine

My first published piece would be a story for my local paper in Bristol. I think it was about a couple that lived on a traffic island because they refused to move out of their home when a road was built.

My first fiction piece was many years later for Take A Break Fiction Feast about a very badly behaved bridegroom’s mother at a wedding and her daughter-in-law’s revenge.

Me.

You had a very wise grandmother!  And your Take a Break story sounds fun.  So tell us about your future plans, please.

Katharine

I’m working on another, more conventional and very contemporary psychological thriller. I’m also very excited about a co-writing project with another author about a well-known artist.

And I have several bits of novels and a whodunnit series I’d love to make progress with if I can find the time.

Me.

That sounds fascinating.  I’m looking forward to your next thriller and intrigued by your co-writing project.  It sounds as if you, like me, are desperately waiting for someone to invent the thirty hour day!

In the meantime, how about sharing three things about you that we might not know?

Katharine.

  1. As a teenager I (very briefly) joined a religious sect.
  2. The first time I tried an avocado I was so horrified by the taste I fainted but it’s now one of my favourite foods (something I tell my children to encourage them to try new foods!)
  3. I’m ambidextrous (but my handwriting’s terrible in either hand)

Me.

I don’t think I’ve ever heard anyone fainting at the taste of an avocado before!  That was a great interview.  Thank you for a great interview and the best of luck with your latest book.  I have just moved it nearer to the top of my tottering To Be Read pile and am really looking forward to reading it..

Please read on for the blurbs from Katharine’s books, the all important buy links and her social media links.

The Secret

Love, Lies, and Betrayal in Wartime Italy.

Two girls growing up in Mussolini’s Italy share a secret that has devastating consequences.

Against a backdrop of fear, poverty and confusion during the Second World War, friendship is tested, and loyalties are divided until a chance encounter changes everything.

Their lives diverge when beautiful, daring Martina marries and moves into Villa Leonida, the most prestigious house in their Tuscan mountain village, while plain, studious Irena trains to be a teacher.

But neither marriage nor life at Villa Leonida are as Martina imagined. And as other people’s lives take on a new purpose, Irena finds herself left behind.

Decades later, a tragedy at the villa coincides with the discovery of an abandoned baby, whose identity threatens to re-open old wounds among the next generation.

The Suspects

Bristol, 1988. Five young graduates on the threshold of their careers buy a house together in order to get a foot on the property ladder before prices rocket out of their reach. But it soon becomes the house share from hell. 

After their New Year’s Eve party, they discover a body – and it’s clear they’ll be the first suspects. As each of them has a good reason from their past not to trust the police, they come up with a solution – one which forces them into a life of secrets and lies. But can they trust each other?

The Silence

Doctor Abby Fenton has a rewarding career, a loving family, an enviable lifestyle – and a secret that could destroy everything. 

When human remains are discovered in the grounds of an idyllic Tuscan holiday home she is forced to confront the memories she has suppressed until now and relive the summer she spent at the villa in 1992. A summer that ended in tragedy. The nearer she gets to the truth the closer she comes to losing her sanity. 

In order to hold onto the people she loves most, she must make sure they never discover what she did. But the reappearance of someone else from that summer threatens to blow her secret wide open.

Lies Mistakes and Misunderstandings

It’s 1931. 

Nothing much has gone right for Jack since he graduated last year. His career has failed to take off, his fiancée has ditched him for someone with better prospects and now he’s received an invitation to their wedding. He dreads going to the wedding alone, surrounded by his high-achieving friends, so when he meets a beautiful girl who offers to accompany him he jumps at the chance. 

But by accepting her invitation he finds himself drawn into a world of intrigue and murder.

Katharine’s social media Links

https://www.facebook.com/katharinejohnsonauthor

https://www.twitter.com/@kjohnsonwrites

https://www.instagram.com/katharinejohnsonauthor

https://www.pinterest.com/katharinejohnsonauthor

https://www.katyjohnsonblog.wordpress.com

https://www.bookbub.com/profile/katharine-johnson

Purchase links for 

The Suspects: https://mybook.to/thesuspects

The Secret.   Https://mybook.to/thesecret

The Silence.   Https://mybook.to/thesilence

Lies, Mistakes and Misunderstandings.  Https://mybook.to/liesmistakes

Author bio

Katharine Johnson is the author of four novels. She grew up in Bristol and currently lives in Berkshire. She’s been a magazine editor and has written for lots of magazines, mostly in the home and lifestyle sector, as well as short stories and a history book. When not writing you’ll usually find her reading, drinking coffee, exploring cities, playing netball, guiding people around a stately home (not her own!) or out walking with her writing buddy, Monty the spaniel.

Where does crime writer Catherine Fearns get her ideas from?

This week I am delighted to welcome crime writer Catherine Fearns to my blog.  Catherine is the author of an intriguing series of thrillers.  I have read and thoroughly enjoyed the first two so was delighted to hear that she’s writing the third.

Me

Hi Catherine and welcome to my blog.  First off, tell us a little about your books.

CF

I write crime thrillers with a supernatural element. Set in contemporary Liverpool, they are inspired by the Victorian gothic, and by the occult detective stories of the early twentieth century. Readers can follow the story as a straight police procedural, or they can wonder whether there might have been other forces at work. I wanted to develop this idea of the unknowable, of the hidden world beyond our own, and I wanted to watch Detective Inspector Darren Swift’s gradual journey from cynicism towards an acceptance of the supernatural.  

Reprobation is inspired by the concept of predestination; the theological doctrine that God decided at the beginning of time who would go to heaven (the elect), or hell (the reprobate). It’s a concept that has always fascinated me. One day I was walking on Crosby Beach, where everybody in Liverpool does their best thinking, and I suddenly had the idea for a story based around this theme. I stayed up all night writing, and by the next morning I had several thousand words and a cast of characters in my head. A crime thriller gradually developed around them. 

Consuming Fire is the sequel to Reprobation, and was published in February 2019. It is also inspired by spiritual themes, although it has a very different feel. When I moved to Switzerland two years ago, I discovered the mysterious phenomenon of coupe-feu. There are traditional healers, known as guérisseurs, who use a combination of pagan ritual and Catholic prayer to cure a range of conditions. Coupe-feu cures burns. It’s still common in Switzerland, and is even done over the telephone. So I rather blasphemously turned this around and wondered what happen if instead of praying to angels to cure burns, you prayed to demons to cause fire? And you did it over the phone? Around the same time I discovered an eighteenth century German epic poem by Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock, which has an obscure subplot in which the fire demon Adramelech plots to become more powerful than both God and Satan. So I thought you could create an evil cult out of these two ideas, a cult that may or may not be responsible for a series of crimes.  

Consuming Fire also employs the gothic technique of the ‘found text’; the main narrative is interspersed with extracts from a mysterious seventeenth century grimoire that may or may not be real. 

Me.

That’s brilliant. (Great covers, too!)  So, how would you describe your genre?

CF

Crime thrillers. Although my books could also be considered within the Supernatural Suspense or even Horror genres. Reprobation can certainly be read as a standalone, but Consuming Fire is a sequel, and I am currently writing the third in the series. 

The Blurbs

Reprobation

Are you one of the elect?
Dr. Helen Hope is a lecturer in eschatology – the study of death, judgement, and the destiny of humankind. She is also a Calvinist nun, her life devoted to atoning for a secret crime.
When a body is found crucified on a Liverpool beach, she forms an unlikely alliance with suspect Mikko Kristensen, lead guitarist in death metal band Total Depravity. Together, they go on the trail of a rogue geneticist who they believe holds the key – not just to the murder, but to something much darker.
Also on the trail is cynical Scouse detective Darren Swift. In his first murder case, he must confront his own lack of faith as a series of horrific crimes drag the city of two cathedrals to the gates of hell.
Science meets religious belief in this gripping murder mystery.

Consuming Fire

Liverpool is in the grip of an intense heatwave, and strange things are happening.
A woman dies in an apparent case of Spontaneous Human Combustion; a truck explodes on the dock road; the charred corpses of pets litter the city; forest fires ravage the pinewoods…and there are birds everywhere, silent flocks drawing in ominously.
Detective Inspector Darren Swift thinks there are connections, and his investigation delves into the worlds of football, nightclubs and organised crime. But is he imagining things?
Dr. Helen Hope doesn’t think so. And she believes the key lies in a mysterious seventeenth-century occult book which has gone missing from Liverpool Library.
In the blistering sequel to Reprobation, DI Swift is forced to confront some inconvenient ghosts from his past, as a terrifying shadow lies over his city’s future….

Me

Both are cracking good reads.  What inspires you most when you sit down to write?  Is it characters? Settings? Books you’ve read?  Or none of the above?

CF

Theme came first; in fact, I didn’t start out writing a crime thriller at all. I started writing about predestination, because I wanted to understand it. I wasn’t sure if it would be a blog post, a piece of historical research, or even a song! But very quickly a story began to construct itself, and the characters took on lives of their own. Before I knew it I was writing a crime thriller. Setting is important; the books are very much tied to their location of Liverpool, and in that sense I have been inspired by crime fiction that has a strong sense of place; for example Dennis Lehane (Boston), Ian Rankin (Edinburgh). Now that I’m on to writing my third book, the characters are well-established and I would say they are taking the lead. DI Darren Swift, Helen Hope and Mikko Kristensen are on their character arcs and I can’t wait to see what happens to them!

Me.

I love the characters and am really looking forward to meeting up with them again.

So, tell us a bit about your writing journey.

CF

Over the years I always loved the writing aspects most about the various jobs I was doing. I worked in banking and had several papers published in very dry financial journals. But I didn’t even imagine being a creative writer until very recently. I was a stay-at-home mum volunteering as a breastfeeding counsellor with a health charity, and I was asked to write a review of some breastfeeding apps for their in-house magazine. It was a very short project but I enjoyed the writing process so much that I think I got the bug. Shortly after that I began writing a blog, more as a diary than anything else, and I found the process very cathartic. The blog led to me getting work as a music journalist, and I was so enthused that within a year I had published nearly fifty articles. Writing for magazines and websites gave me the discipline of being professionally edited and I began seriously learning the craft. I joined a writers’ group and tried some short stories and flash fiction. I had to work hard to stamp out the clipped, legal tone in which I had been trained to write professionally, and it was a joy to return to a more natural, literary style. I would say that my writing is still quite concise though. My books are relatively short; I definitely wouldn’t describe myself as florid!

Reprobation was not my first attempt at a novel; a 60,000-word manuscript for The Veilmaker lies hidden password-protected beneath a series of subfolders on my laptop. I cringe to think that I actually submitted it to a few agents, and it has now been abandoned! But this was the novel in which I taught myself how to write a novel. 

Me.

We’ve all got those hidden away first attempts, haven’t we?  But, as you say, it’s the best way to learn your craft.  Tell us a little about your future plans.

CF

I’m really excited about the third book in this series, entitled Sound, which is currently being edited and will be released this September. It’s very much a sequel to Consuming Fire, and the three books form a trilogy. After that, if people are still enjoying my series I’d love to carry on and see where it leads. There is a lot of potential I think.

But I also have a couple of ideas floating around for historical novels. My degree was in History, and I loved the historical research I had to do for Consuming Fire, including the process of writing the seventeenth century pastiche elements. 

I will also carry on with my freelance music journalism; it barely pays but it’s a great excuse to go to the heavy metal concerts that I love. 

Me.

That’s great.  I have to admit, heavy metal music is a closed book to me but I absolutely loved that aspect of your books.  And as for the gorgeous Mikko…..

Now, how about sharing with us three things that we might not know about you?

fearnslowres

  1. 1. I almost became a concert pianist. As a teenager I performed in big competitions and had an audition for a conservatoire. But I decided to do an academic degree instead. For a while I played for weddings, restaurants, theatres and so on, but I eventually stopped completely. And it’s probably my biggest regret. I always feel a bit sad when I sit at a piano now. I’m sure that’s why I write about music. And why I force my kids to have piano lessons! 
  1. 2. I play guitar and sing backing vocals in a heavy metal band. I absolutely love it, but I’m not very good at the guitar, I don’t really know how to sing, and I’m by far the oldest in the band. Our drummer is 14, to give you an idea. It’s like that movie School Of Rock, and I am definitely the embarrassing Jack Black character. 

3. Reprobation was written entirely at night. My youngest daughter didn’t start school until this year, and I have three other children, so my days were full. Plus I was too embarrassed to tell my husband I was writing a novel, so I didn’t write in the evenings. I would wait until everyone was asleep and then sneak out of bed. Now I have weekdays to myself when the kids are at school, and I’d like to tell you that Consuming Fire was written at a romantic desk or in a lakeside café, but I have to admit that my favourite place to write is my local McDonalds. 

Me.

McDonalds, eh? Now, that’s something I have yet to try!  Thank you so much, Catherine for such a fascinating interview.

And now, for those all important social media links

 

Website: https://www.catherine-fearns.com/

Twitter: @metalmamawrites

The all important buy link.

mybook.to/reprobation

mybook.to/consumingfire

Author Bio

Catherine Fearns is from Liverpool, UK. As a music journalist she writes for Pure Grain Audio, Broken Amp and Noisey. Her short fiction and non-fiction pieces have been published in Here Comes Everyone, Toasted Cheese, Offshoots & Metal Music Studies. She holds a degree in History from Oxford University, a Masters from the London School of Economics, and is a member of the Crime Writers’ Association. She lives in Geneva with her husband and four children. 

Where does crime writer, Val Penny, get her ideas from?

A slight change of direction

When I started this blog, back in March, it was only intended as a record of my faltering steps towards publication of my debut crime novel Murder Served Cold which was published in October.   Link here. 

The publication date is the reason for the longer than intended gap between posts as I completely underestimated the amount of time the marketing/social media aspect side of the writing business would take – not to mention the fact that I’m busy writing the second in the series, provisional title Rough and Deadly,  to a very tight December deadline.  (No Christmas shopping for me this year! Yayy!)

Having achieved my publication date goal, I would now like to change the emphasis of this blog slightly and include interviews with other writers.  I shall still continue to post about my own progress (or lack of it)  as I get down to what I am fast discovering is the really hard bit about writing a novel – ie getting it ‘out there’.

The blog will still include my daily prompts and the current ones (albeit slightly late, for which I apologise) are, as always at the end.

Why a guest post?

IdeasStoreWhen I’m not writing crime fiction, I also write a monthly column, Ideas Store, for the UK magazine, Writers Forum.  (Link here). I have been doing so for eleven years and have ‘met’ so many great authors in that time who patiently and generously respond to my question: Where do you get your ideas from?

But there is never enough space in my column for all I would like to include, nor room for author pictures or book links.  So I’ve decided to include some of them as guests on my blog on a regular basis.

One of the big bonuses for me when Crooked Cat Books agreed to publish my first book, Murder Served Cold, was being introduced to a galaxy of new to me writers, one of which is my first guest, crime writer Val Penny.

author-pic-2Val is the author of the Edinburgh Mystery Series featuring Detective Inspector Hunter Wilson.  I have read and very much enjoyed the first two books in the series and am looking forward to the next one.

My interview with Val Penny’

Me:

 Hi Val, Thank you so much for agreeing to appear on my blog.  Now, that question that all writers dread to hear: 

Where did you get the idea for your book from?

VP:

 I always find this question the most difficult to answer, but I will try! I first began writing novels when I was being treated for breast cancer. I was very ill and had little energy except to read, watch daytime TV and try to beat the disease. 

As anybody who has been poorly and subjected to daytime TV will attest, it gets very old very fast, so I began a blog to review the books that I read www.bookreviewstoday.info

When I began to recover, I still had little energy, but needed something to occupy my mind. It was at this point that he who is known as Handsome Hubby suggested that, if I knew so much about what made everybody else’s books good, or not, I should write one of my own. (If only it was that simple!) Anyway, I accepted the challenge and, as my favourite genre to read is crime, I decided to try my hand at writing a crime novel.

The first character to be created was Joe Johnson: he came about from a throw-away comment made by an assistant in my office many years ago. She said she liked to be able to see the customers before she could smell them! So Joe Johnson was born and the rest of the story in Hunter’s Chase was created around him. 

Me: Tell us a little about your book.  What is your genre? Is it a series or standalone?

VP:

I write crime thrillers: the sub-genre is probably police procedurals. The novels I write form a series, The Edinburgh Crime Mysteries. I like to be able to tell the stories of the individual character’s lives as well interesting my readers in the crime DI Hunter Wilson and his team have to solve.

Crooked Cat Books published the first in the series, Hunter’s Chase, on 02.02.2019 and the second, Hunter’s Revenge on 09.09.2018.  The links are:

myBook.to/HuntersChase

myBook.to/HuntersRevenge

The third in the series, Hunter’s Force will be published in Spring 2019. 

  1. The book’s blurb – Hunter’s Chase.

519VedYjK8L._AC_US218_Detective Inspector Hunter Wilson knows there is a new supply of cocaine flooding his city, and he needs to find the source, but his attention is transferred to murder when a corpse is discovered in the grounds of a golf course.

Shortly after the post-mortem, Hunter witnesses a second murder, but that is not the end of the slaughter. With a young woman’s life also hanging in the balance, the last thing Hunter needs is a new man on his team: Detective Constable Tim Myerscough, the son of his nemesis, the former Chief Constable Sir Peter Myerscough.

Hunter’s perseverance and patience are put to the test time after time in this first novel in The Edinburgh Crime Mysteries series.

51KrSzhcIKL._AC_US218_

  1. The book’s blurb – Hunter’s Revenge

Who would want to harm the quiet, old man? Why was a book worth £23,000 delivered to him that morning? Why is the security in George’s home so intense?
Hunter must investigate his friend’s past as well as the present to identify George’s killer.

When a new supply of cocaine from Peru floods HMP Edinburgh and the city, the courier leads Hunter to a criminal gang, but Hunter requires the help of his nemesis, the former Chief Constable, Sir Peter Myerscough, and local gangster, Ian Thomson, to make his case.

Hunter’s perseverance and patience are put to the test time after time in this taut crime thriller.

Me: That’s great, thank you.  Now, tell me a bit more about your writing life in general, please. What inspires you most?  Characters?  Settings? Books you have read?

VP

I am most inspired to tell the story of my characters and how these play into the crimes investigated in the novels. Having said that, the setting of the beautiful city of Edinburgh is also important and it is a treat to have to research areas of the city that I would not have a chance to visit otherwise.

Me: How did you writing journey start?  Have you always written?  What was your first published piece.

VP:

I have always enjoyed writing and telling stories. Even when I was a little girl I used to make up stories for my little sister. However, my first published pieces were all non- fiction articles published in dry, dusty old journals and my first creative pieces, were poems included in national poetry anthologies.

Me: And your future plans?  More in the Edinburgh Crime series, I hope!

VP:

I am now about to start the edits for the third book in The Edinburgh Crime Mysteries series, Hunter’s Force and I am writing the fourth in the series, Hunter’s Blood. 

I was also asked to speak at The Swanwick Writers’ Summer School this year and I, as I lectured at Heriot Watt University for years, I would be thrilled to get more involved in speaking at writers’ conferences.

…………

Thank you so much for that, Val.  That was fascinating and I wish you the success you so richly deserve with the Edingburgh Mystery Series.

Would you like to be featured here?

If you’re a writer and would like to be featured either in this blog or my column in Writers’ Forum (or preferably both!) please get in touch.  Or, if you have read a book that you really enjoyed and can’t sleep at night until you find out where the author got that particular idea from, do let me know and I’ll do my best to find out..

And finally….

And no, I hadn’t forgotten the daily prompts.   If this is your first visit to my blog, check back to this page for advice on how to use them.

Daily Prompts. 16th October – 15th November

October

16. My heart leaps up when I behold/A rainbow in the sky (Wordsworth)

17. “This time,” he croaked, “I’m really, really ill.”

18. There’s a first time for everything.

19. You wake up – and everything is different.

20. Write about falling.  In love?  Down a hole? On a dream?  You decide.

21. She was wearing my ring.

22. You can’t teach an old dog new tricks (Proverb)

23. Catching someone in the act of cheating

24. “It’s all you could expect,” he said.

25. An abandoned house.

26. Your first car.

27. It’s too soon to tell.

28. Being lost along the way.

29. Returning takes too long.

30. The difference between men and women.

31. This is what was left when he had gone.

November

1. On this day in 1848 the first WH Smith railway bookstall opened on Euston Station.

2. I hate this time of the year.  It’s so …….

3. Write about a time someone said yes.

4. Before I was born…..

5. Rising early to begin a journey

6. One man (or woman) and his/her dog.

7. “Love comes from blindness, friendship from knowledge. (Comte de Bussy-Rabutin)

8. She who must be obeyed.

9. The stranger

10. An overheard conversation

11. Out of the corner of my eye I can see …..

12. To everything there is a season

13. The end of the street.

14. Every man is his own worst enemy (proverb)

15. Write about an island.

How to define your genre (or maybe not….)

This past week I’ve been booking a blog tour of book reviewers. This has involved filling in loads of forms, with author pics and bios and I’m very excited to say that I have a tour booked with Rachel’s Random Resources for 10th  16th November.

BlogTourRRR

In my last blog post I was whingeing (sorry, writing) about how difficult it was to write a blurb for my book.  This week I’ve found another hurdle that had me skittering away like a spooked pony and was a major stumbling block when I was filling out Rachel’s form.

My stumbling block consisted of just three little words.

 Define.  Your.  Genre.

So I did what I always do when I’m spooked.  I turned to the experts.  In this case one of my go-to how to write books, ‘Love Writing’ by the very talented Sue Moorcroft (link here) who knows more about writing than I ever will ever. 

Sue says genre is important for these reasons.

1. Publishers need to know where to place a book on their lists.

2. Booksellers need to know where to place it on their shelves.

3. Publicists need to know to understand what they’re promoting.

BUT

4. Most important of all:  Readers need to know if you write the kind of thing they like to read.

Now there’s no point reading the advice of an expert like Sue if you’re not prepared to buckle down and act on it.  So, that is what I did.

This is the conversation between me and my Inner Critic (IC) , the voice in my head that’s nagged at me ever since the moment I signed the contract for Murder Served Cold and everything became horribly real.  (Publication date October 19th…. eek!)

Me:  It says… (groans) Define your genre.  What?  I can’t do this.

IC: Of course you can’t.  You don’t even know what genre means.

Me: Yes I do.  I’m a writer.  I know things. 

IC: Go on then.  What does it mean?

Me: Well, um,  it means what sort of a book is it.  

IC: Oh right. I see.  Is there a genre then for rubbish, then?

Me: No, it means where would you find this in, say, a bookshop or a library?

IC: The waste bin?  The recycling box?

Me: According to Sue, it’s to help people decide whether or not they want to read my book.  Say, for example, you were a lover of horror, then my book would probably not be your thing.

IC: So whose ‘thing’ will it be?  Who do you think will want to read Murder Served Cold?  

Me:  Well, it’s a murder mystery –

IC: Really?  I’d never have guessed from the title.  So, does that mean there’s lots of blood and gore in it?

Me: Oh no, nothing like that.  I’m a bit squeamish and not very good at blood and gore.  But there’s plenty of humour, as well as a touch of romance.  

IC: Ooh!  Lots of sexy scenes then?

Me: Well, no.  I’m afraid not.  I’m not very good at sexy scenes either.  I keep thinking of people I know reading it.

IC: But just now you were worried that nobody would read it.

Me: I know.  But if they did…  Anyway, I’ve got to come up with a genre.  It says so here on Rachel’s form.  So I’ve been checking out other books that are similar to mine and I think I’m going to put Cosy Crime as the genre.  Besides, that’s what it says on my book’s cover.

IC: Cosy crime?  Do you mean it’s about little old ladies who knit running round solving mysteries, helped by their cats? 

Me:  Absolutely not.  Kat is a struggling young journalist – or she would be if someone gave her a job.  She’s part of the ‘boomerang’ generation.  There’s no knitting involved.

IC: Ha! But there’s a cat in it.  I knew it.

Me: Not that sort of cat.  Her name’s Kat, only no one ever remembers to call her that.  And she – oh, you’ll just have to read the book.

IC: Me?  You’ve got to be kidding.  Cosy Crime is so not my ‘genre’. Particularly if there are no knitting grannies or crime solving cats in it.

On a lighter note…

If, like IC above, cosy crime is not your genre either then how about revisiting the classics?

I have recently discovered dailylit.com, a website that delivers bite sized pieces of fiction which are sent to your inbox every day.  At the moment, I am thoroughly enjoying revisiting E.M. Forster’s ‘Room with a View’, something I haven’t read since my schooldays.

(I wonder if E.M. Forster had to worry his head about what genre ‘Room With A View’ was?)

I find I really look forward to each day’s instalment and am at present on part 18/81.  I love the gentle pace of the book and had forgotten the pleasure in reading something slowly.  Everything I do at the moment seems to be done at breakneck speed, but this daily dose of E.M. Forster is a little oasis of calm in my busy day and I love it.

It’s not just the classics on offer from DailyLit but most genres (that word again!) and include fiction and non fiction.

Daily Prompts.  1st-15th October.

I hope you’re  finding my Daily Prompts useful as starting off points for your great ideas.  (link to Where do you get your ideas from?) I look forward one day to a writer, in answer to my question, “Where do you get your ideas from” replying: Why, Paula, from your Daily Prompts, of course! (IC: Huh! Watch out for flying pigs!)

1. “Where am I going?  I don’t know/What does it matter where people go?” A.A. Milne

2. My first day at school.

3. Leaving somewhere (or someone) for the last time.

4. My favourite place.

5. Riding for a fall.

6. Divided loyalties.

7. Holding a new born baby.

8. Hearing an echo.

9. You’re walking alone, along a dimly lit street, when you hear footsteps behind you.

10. A fall from grace.

11. Just beyond the edge of the woods.

12. Attempting to avoid someone.

13. “This is not about you,” I yelled.

14. The first star of the evening.

15. He that suppeth with the devil needs a long spoon. (Proverb)

And finally…

What’s your favourite genre?  And do you read slowly?  And, go on, tell me: where do you get your ideas from?  I’d love to know.